Taking Back the STreets

PROJECT TYPE

Public Art Installation

LOCATION

Binondo

COLLABORATORS

Kris Abrigo
Recolor

STATUS

Completed in 2019

PHOTO CREDITS

Ian Estrada

This is our second time working with Recolor, an group who organizes initiatives to bring design and art to urban spaces to benefit the community. We teamed up with the original Recolor Team of Brandon Ang and Kris Abrigo, in partnership with Julia Nebrija and the organizers of the Escolta Block Festival 2019.

For this project, we created a pop-up park on the corner of Quintin Paredes and Ongpin Streets, a space fronting the Binondo Church.



Taking Back the STreets

PROJECT TYPE

Public Art Installation

LOCATION

Binondo

COLLABORATORS

Kris Abrigo
Recolor

STATUS

Completed in 2019

PHOTO CREDITS

Ian Estrada

This is our second time working with Recolor, an group who organizes initiatives to bring design and art to urban spaces to benefit the community. We teamed up with the original Recolor Team of Brandon Ang and Kris Abrigo, in partnership with Julia Nebrija and the organizers of the Escolta Block Festival 2019.

For this project, we created a pop-up park on the corner of Quintin Paredes and Ongpin Streets, a space fronting the Binondo Church.


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We utilized the same materials as the first Recolor project, namely reclaimed wood from pallets and acrylic spray paint. We were able to create 8 pieces of urban furniture with the materials we procured, and the pieces were designed mainly for seating, varying in height, form and scale. Some pieces were more intimate, while some could accommodate larger groups -- this was to allow different levels of activity and interaction in the space. 

We painted large sections of each furniture in bright, vibrant colors to make them fun and inviting. Some sections we kept unfinished to make keep the reclaimed nature of the wood apparent. There were small, random blocks of wood among the materials we were able to purchase, and we decided to paint them as well and hand them out as souvenirs to visitors of the park.

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The production of the park only took a few days, thanks to the group of volunteers who worked with us. On the day of the set-up, visual artist Leeroy New lent us his banderitas and vines made from recycled plastic to style the park. We arranged them together with some large potted plants gathered from around the park's neighborhood.

The reception to the pop-up park was overwhelming. Once we completed the set-up, people immediately started to gather. Some would walk by and admire the space; some groups would sit on the furniture and chat, while others took pictures of themselves and the park. The highlight of the pop-up was the walking tour hosted by Escolta Block Festival’s organizers culminating the activity in the park before returning to the First United Building.

We believe this project was successful in its goal of incorporating art and design in the community, and we hope that in the future, Recolor’s proposed park becomes a more permanent feature of the area.